Thursday, January 22, 2009

So Now the Constitution Matters?

Obama took the oath of office a second time because Judge Roberts didn't read the oath exactly as the Constitution specified, and this caused Obama to likewise err. Gotta do it over. We wouldn't want to violate the Constitution.

Meanwhile, we're involved in two wars that were never declared by Congress, and the Constitution specifies that the Congress is to declare war. Using gold or silver as currency is illegal, though the Consitution says that only gold and silver are to be used as legal tender. The Constitution does not grant the federal government the authority to heap upon foreign nations money used to control their citizens, but we heap billions upon such nations. The Bill of Rights guarantees freedom of speech, yet certain political speech, such as say a paid television advertisement, is illegal for ordinary citizens in the weeks prior to an actual election. The fourth ammendment protects us from searches without probable cause. Apparently this means a state can't regulate abortion, but doesn't mean that the government can't monitor our internet usage or phone calls.

So why bother with a second oath. The Constitution is already irrelevant.

2 comments:

DagoodS said...

Not to mention habeas corpus circumvented by Guantanamo Bay.

SciFi2495 said...

Yes, it's an old post, but I wanted to add that the Drug War violates more Constitutional protections against state intrusion on daily lives than any other reason.

4th Amendment never seems to apply if the reason is drugs. If someone is given the right to cross-examine the accused in every other case, in blind, arbitrary and awarded 800# turn-ins, these protections do not apply, as long as drugs are the issue.

Vaisnivist Hindus cannot legally use their Bhang in this country because it is Cannabis. Many religious, otherwise fine citizens, are prosecuted for using Cannabis and its extracts for religious purposes, despite First Amendment protections.

I could go on, but you get the idea. Just look up "drug war victims".